February 12, 2013 – Lake Fork Fishing Report

With the warmer weather, our water temperatures have been on the rise. This week, I found water as warm as 58.5 degrees, and most of the areas we fished were over 56 degrees. The warmer temps pulled a lot of big females onto the flats and secondary points where we were able to cover some water and catch them a little more easily. Water level as of this writing is 398.89 (4.11 ft below full pool), but it is slowly on the rise with the rain that we are receiving as I write.

Our best bait has been a red lipless crankbait, but you should also try a Santone spinnerbait, a Chatterbait with LFT Live Magic Shad, and a jerkbait in the same areas. Many times, we will go through an area a couple of times with the lipless crankbait, and go back through it with another bait and pick up another fish or two. You want to be very thorough when covering water as a bass’s strike zone is fairly small in this cool water. Almost all of our fish are coming from less than 3 feet of water, and if you can find some hydrilla or coontail, you will likely find some fish.

The weather forecast for the coming week shows highs in the mid-50s and lows in the low 30s. This will bring the water temps back down into the low 50s, and maybe even the upper 40s. When this happens, it’s time to pick up your Black/Blue, Camo, or Sloppy Joe colored Santone Jig, move out to the creek channels, and go to work. When the water temps fall, I normally have better success using a LFT Flipper for my jig trailer, but when water temps are on the rise, I tend to opt more for the bigger LFT Hyper Freak. The Flipper is a little more subtle in it’s action than the Hyper Freak, and sometimes, that makes all the difference when these fish are finicky. You want to split the tail on the Flipper as it is designed with “rudders” that force the tail to spread out when it’s moved, making it look a lot like a crawfish. I will work the standing timber along the banks of the creek channels in about 5-15 ft of water. When you catch one, pay attention to the fish’s depth. If you catch one in 8 ft of water, and another in 12 ft of water, but nothing shallower and nothing deeper, you can probably save yourself a lot of time by concentrating your efforts in that depth range when you move to the next creek.

I hope that helps you on your next trip to Lake Fork. If you have any questions, please let me know!

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April 21, 2012

My apologies for the lack of reports lately. The honest truth is that the lake has been kicking my butt lately. We’re catching 15-20 each day, but it hasn’t been easy. I wish I could point you in the right direction as far as a solid pattern goes, but I’ve basically been “junk fishing” for the past week and a half. I was waiting to post a report after I had things figured out and I could give you more specific information. I’ve got them figured out now, but there’s not one “best” way to catch the big fish right now!!!

There are a lot of post spawn fish right now, but there are still a few prespawn and spawners. I have been trying my best to pattern the bigger fish as I believe that’s what most of my clients come to Lake Fork for. These big fish have been next to impossible to zero in on and that’s the main reason why I’ve been trying different depths, areas, and presentations, and that has lead to fewer fish in the boat than what I am accustomed to catching most days for this time of year. I could catch far more numbers each day if I (clients) really wanted to, but most of them would be of the smaller “fry guarding” male variety.

For me, the best time of the day for numbers of solid fish (with the occasional big fish) has been the first hour or two of the day. The topwater bite has been good most mornings and very good to excellent other mornings. The trick is being on the right point at the right time, and that’s not always easy. We are bouncing around from point to point hoping to find the school of fish that we’re looking for before our window of opportunity closes. Walking baits have been best most days, but it’s always a good idea to have a popping bait ready just in case. Squarebilled crankbaits can be highly effective in the right areas on days when the fish don’t seem to want to come up on a topwater. And lastly, a Carolina rigged LFT Hyperstick will put some big fish in the boat in the same areas once the topwater bite ends.

After that ends, I’ve been trying lots of different things. Some days, my best bite is on a LFT Magic Shad in the flooded grass. Other days, I’ve had good success pitching a LFT Flipper to shallow timber. While other days, we can get them to bite a topwater or frog all day long. The best thing to do right now is to pick your favorite way to catch fish and cover lots of water. There are fish in the backs of creeks, on the main lake, and everywhere in between right now. I can’t honestly tell you that one bait or one location is much better than the other.

The good news is that we have had an incredibly good spawn this year. I have seen A LOT of fry from one end of the lake to the other, and with the higher water levels, there is plenty of shoreline cover for these youngsters to hide in.

Also, the deep bite will be picking up soon, and that makes for some fantastic fishing on Lake Fork.

March 2, 2012

The bite is definitely picking up as a big number of fish have made the move to ultra shallow water since noon yesterday.

Water temp on the main lake was 59 and we found water as warm as 67 in the back of a creek and the fish were bunched up back there.

We caught a bunch of fish today on a white 3/8 oz chatterbait with a LFT Live Magic Shad in Albino Shad color. We also caught a bunch of fish on a Junebug colored Texas rigged LFT Flipper.

Most of our fish came from less than 3 ft of water.